Matt and Chris celebrate our 30th episode and toast Davie County with a Frostbite Black IPA from Foothills Brewing in neighboring Forsyth County.  Matt questions the genealogy of Davie and neighboring Davidson County.  Chris notes the long tenure of Governor William R. Davie, the namesake of Davie County.

Matt gets… somewhat excited about the boundaries of Davie County, which include the Yadkin River to the east, and to the south with… the South Yadkin River. Chris questions the sources on where exactly High Rock Lake begins- which may be the confluence of the Yadkin and South Yadkin Rivers, but might actually be in the town of Yadkin.

Speaking of the geography of Davie County, Matt and Chris debate the pronunciation of the Piedmont. Next Chris and Matt discuss the county’s RiverPark at Cooleemee, home to the famous Bull Hole. Matt reminisces about the Jesus reunion tour ’86 which may have gone through Jerusalem but probably did not go through Mocksville, which evidently is a hotbed of crime.

Speaking of Mocksville, Chris discusses the Daniel Boone Family Festival of Mocksville and Boone’s Cave Park just across the Yadkin River from Davie County.  The County Boys get excited about a cameo appearance of a Lords Proprietor.

Matt dives deep into Davie County’s NC Bike Fest (NSF normal people).

You can dive into the Bull Hole and listen to this episode at:


Matt reminisces about his two uneventful trips to Davidson County. Chris discusses the surprisingly high population of Davidson County. Matt discusses Pat Summit and the amateur and professional basketball career of Davidson (College) graduate Woodrow Wilson. Chris speculates about whether the Sapona Indians hold a grudge about losing their river name.  Matt notices the dichotomy between Thomasville being home to the big chair but not being the county seat of Davidson County.

Davidson County is associated with a handful of famous- or semi-famous people, including its namesake Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, Revolutionary War patriot, and Thomasville’s namesake John W. Thomas.

Chris and Matt toast Davidson County with a Fearrington Summer from Durham County’s Fullsteam Brewery. Appropriate in Chris’ mind since sweet tea goes well with barbecue.  After having perhaps too much Fearrington Summer, Matt volunteers various places he aint too proud to swim.

Chris lays out the differences between ‘western’ or Lexington style barbecue and ‘eastern’ style barbecue. Matt recommends for its domain name and bbq reviews.  Matt wonders if it is enough in life to be delicious.

The boys also talk about High Rock Lake, a bit about the Uwharrie Mountains, and Thomasville’s
Everybody’s Day.

You can listen to this episode at:

Chris talks about the Qualla Boundary, colloquially known as the Cherokee reservation- despite the fact that the land that was purchased privately and not reserved by any government for the Cherokee.  Matt expresses his anger at the treatment of Native Americans during their relocation in the 1800s on the Trail of Tears.  Chris discusses the process of pumping water up to the top of a damn to store energy.  Matt admonishes Chris for mentioning other forms of media or entertainment that may distract our listener.  Matt notices the frequency with which leaders go into the woods and come up with an epiphany that starts a movement. Chris points out that “they” have in fact done a religious-themed putt-putt course.


The 10 Commandments at Fields of the Wood


Matt and Chris listen to Weezer’s Pinkerton.