Matt and Chris harmonize over Franklin County, a “Research Triangle Region Community”.

Chris talks about not-long-for-this-world Bute County and the Duke of Earl, the exploits of Benjamin Franklin, and the Tuscarora Indians. Matt notes the downfalls of wearing Franklins. Chris wonders about the pronunciation of Franklin County’s seat, Louisburg.  (Charming since 1779!)  Matt pitches Franklin County livin’ for its proximity to the Triangle.

Matt bombs the quiz concerning the town of Franklin and the county of Franklin. Chris tries to navigate the waters of the Tar River.

Chris notices that Franklin County is home fo the World Whistling Championship… and promptly gets sucked into an internet blackhole of whistling.  It’s all true.

Perhaps Chris should have looked harder for some of the beer on the banks of the Tar River flowing through Franklin County. As it is Chris toasted Franklin County with a Skillet Stout from Buncombe County’s Burial Beer, while Matt throws down with Some L.A. Crow Ten.

Hopefully you don’t have to look hard to find a link to this episode- you can listen easy at:

In episode 34 Matt and Chris bridge the hyphenated spans of Forsyth County, North Carolina’s fourth most populous county.

Forsyth County is located in North Carolina’s piedmont, a word with surprising italian origins.  The biggest city in Forsyth County is Winston hyphen Salem.  Young Salem was founded in 1766, while Winston was founded much later in 1849 (but named in 1851).  The two cities merged in 1913, leading to the moniker twin-cities, and Matt is ready for the Minneapolis v Winston-Salem showdown.

Forsyth County was named after Colonel Benjamin Forsyth, famous for his exploits in the War of 1812.  Although Chris argues that was the only time Washington DC was conquered by a foreign occupying force, Matt seems to recall a few other invasions.

We toast Forsyth County with a Jade IPA from Foothills Brewery in Forsyth County.  Foothills Brewery began brewing in 2005 in Winston-Salem, and is now the second largest craft brewer in North Carolina (by beer production).

Apart from Foothills Brewery and RJ Reynolds Tobacco, Winston-Salem is also home to Krispy Kreme donuts, founded in the hyphen in 1937 by Vernon Rudolph. Winston-Salem was also home to the headquarters of Wachovia Bank, and still home to the tallest building in the Carolinas outside of Raleigh and Charlotte.

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Matt and Chris celebrate our 30th episode and toast Davie County with a Frostbite Black IPA from Foothills Brewing in neighboring Forsyth County.  Matt questions the genealogy of Davie and neighboring Davidson County.  Chris notes the long tenure of Governor William R. Davie, the namesake of Davie County.

Matt gets… somewhat excited about the boundaries of Davie County, which include the Yadkin River to the east, and to the south with… the South Yadkin River. Chris questions the sources on where exactly High Rock Lake begins- which may be the confluence of the Yadkin and South Yadkin Rivers, but might actually be in the town of Yadkin.

Speaking of the geography of Davie County, Matt and Chris debate the pronunciation of the Piedmont. Next Chris and Matt discuss the county’s RiverPark at Cooleemee, home to the famous Bull Hole. Matt reminisces about the Jesus reunion tour ’86 which may have gone through Jerusalem but probably did not go through Mocksville, which evidently is a hotbed of crime.

Speaking of Mocksville, Chris discusses the Daniel Boone Family Festival of Mocksville and Boone’s Cave Park just across the Yadkin River from Davie County.  The County Boys get excited about a cameo appearance of a Lords Proprietor.

Matt dives deep into Davie County’s NC Bike Fest (NSF normal people).

You can dive into the Bull Hole and listen to this episode at:

 

Matt reminisces about his two uneventful trips to Davidson County. Chris discusses the surprisingly high population of Davidson County. Matt discusses Pat Summit and the amateur and professional basketball career of Davidson (College) graduate Woodrow Wilson. Chris speculates about whether the Sapona Indians hold a grudge about losing their river name.  Matt notices the dichotomy between Thomasville being home to the big chair but not being the county seat of Davidson County.

Davidson County is associated with a handful of famous- or semi-famous people, including its namesake Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, Revolutionary War patriot, and Thomasville’s namesake John W. Thomas.

Chris and Matt toast Davidson County with a Fearrington Summer from Durham County’s Fullsteam Brewery. Appropriate in Chris’ mind since sweet tea goes well with barbecue.  After having perhaps too much Fearrington Summer, Matt volunteers various places he aint too proud to swim.

Chris lays out the differences between ‘western’ or Lexington style barbecue and ‘eastern’ style barbecue. Matt recommends BBQJew.com for its domain name and bbq reviews.  Matt wonders if it is enough in life to be delicious.

The boys also talk about High Rock Lake, a bit about the Uwharrie Mountains, and Thomasville’s
Everybody’s Day.

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Its raining at least one Benjamin on the County Boys. Chris really gets into the Revolutionary War and the Battle of Kings Mountain which probably occurred… on Browns Mountain in South Carolina.  Matt praises the historical society and preservation folks of Shelby and Cleveland County.  Chris talks about Oliver Max and the Cleveland County Dynasty (which does not involve the Cavaliers or Indians).  Matt talks about the livermush festival.

Matt and Chris talk with a Cleveland County native Sean.  Sean describes the world’s most delicious rivalry.

The Battle of Kings Mountain by Don Troiani.

You can watch a piece on the Revolutionary War drama Liberty Mountain:

Matt and Chris listen to Frank Ocean’s nostalgia, ULTRA.

You can hear about Cleveland County North Carolina and listen to this episode: